Tools of

East Asian Medicine

 
Acupuncture

My acupuncture training has been influenced from Traditional Chinese, Japanese, and modern palpation-based practices. I work to assess and balance the body's meridians by what I see on the tongue and what I feel in your pulse, and what I feel flowing throughout your body's meridians.

 

In my clinic you can expect gentle, effective techniques that are always patient-led treatments. What does this mean? It means that the treatments I give my patients are always specifically tailored to the patient's needs. This is hands-on, customized medicine, the way it was always meant to be.  For more info on common symptoms acupuncture can treat see here.

 
Bodywork

I have been trained in both Shiatsu and Tuina, Japanese and Chinese Medical Massage respectively. I like to include bodywork with all of my sessions because I feel it helps integrate and enhance the treatment's effects. 

Shiatsu is a very gentle, methodical, pressing and stretching type of massage. When I have had Shiatsu massage I feel like I could take a really great nap or get a long night of sleep.

Tuina is a more vibrant style of body work that is active. Joint mobility, soft tissue manipulation techniques, and stretching help make short work of sore and tired muscles. When I have received a Tuina session I feel charged and ready to take on the day.

 

 
Cupping

You've probably seen a picture of somebody that has gotten cupping? It looks like an octopus attacked them? Big purple spots lining both sides of the spine? Yes, this is that!

 

Cupping is one of my favorite tools to provide quick relief for those chronically sore and tight muscles. It's quick, strong, effective, and yes, it does leave a temporary mark, but you won't regret it when it helps your stubborn pain melt away.

 
Nutrition

Just like acupuncture, bodywork, and cupping, nutrition is one of the most important pieces of the puzzle when it comes to our wellness. I strive to balance within the body what is hot and cold, dry and damp, excessive and deficient, yin and yang. What we eat, how we eat, and how much we eat give us energy, so we must be mindful of what we put inside. Food can be medicine too! 

 

While I know mindfulness is challenging in our fast-paced society, nutrition is where our wellness develops. I'm happy to work together to talk about foods that can be the most nourishing and customize a plan for your constitution. 

 
Breath & Movement

The breath supports our body. It literally sustains us and continues throughout our days without us ever having to think about it. What if we could be more intentional about our breath and how we breathe? Most of us can benefit from a practice of mindful  movement and stretching with breath. I'm happy to share my knowledge of Tai Chi and Qi Gong to help you connect movement and breath, to support and nourish mind and body.

 
Recovery Support

I'm talking about drugs, alcohol, PTSD, eating disorder recovery, and supportive treatment to heal quickly from surgeries. 

 

My experience working at Evergreen Treatment Center, Mary's Place and the Asian Counseling and Referral Service (ACRS) Center in Seattle impressed upon me the importance of lifting up our community by serving those in need and wanting to better their lives. I am NADA (National Acupuncture Detoxification Association) certified and have worked with methadone patients receiving the benefits of simple ear protocols that help them navigate the effects of 'coming down' opioid use. 

These protocols are often used in areas of crisis where individuals have suffered mass trauma such as global natural disasters and areas of war. Positive responses were reported by patients as increased ability to sleep, less headaches and sweating, a feeling of hope, a sense of calm wellbeing, and a decrease in acute and chronic pain.

My capstone was created around the idea that these same protocols might be supportive to individuals seeking treatment for eating disorders. While this is a topic that fascinates and inspires me, I will strive to continue to research this topic and would be happy to meet with any patient interested in supporting their ED recovery journey.

For any questions you have, you can reach me here:

Amanda Anuraga, EAMP

2211 Pacific Ave.
Tacoma, WA 98402

(within Tacoma Natural Health)

hello@TacomaEastAsianMed.com

p: 253.254.6498

f:  888.699.5952

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